2013 What’s On Stage Award nominations

THE DIGITAL THEATRE BEST ACTRESS IN A PLAY

Sheridan Smith – Hedda Gabler at the Old Vic
Billie Piper – The Effect, Headlong at the National, Cottesloe
Hattie Morahan – A Doll’s House at the Young Vic
Jill Halfpenny – Abigail’s Party at the Menier Chocolate Factory & Wyndham’s
Julie Walters – The Last of the Haussmans at the National, Lyttelton
Sally Hawkins – Constellations at the Royal Court Upstairs & Duke of York’s

THE DIGITAL THEATRE BEST ACTOR IN A PLAY

Rupert Everett – The Judas Kiss at Hampstead
Adrian Lester – Red Velvet at the Tricycle
David Haig – The Madness of George III at the Apollo
David Suchet – Long Day’s Journey into Night at the Apollo
Luke Treadaway – The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time at the National, Cottesloe
Mark Rylance – Twelfth Night & Richard III at Shakespeare’s Globe & the Apollo Continue reading “2013 What’s On Stage Award nominations”

DVD Review: Wilde

“It is monstrous how people say things behind one’s back that are perfectly true”

Based on Richard Ellman’s biography, Brian Gilbert’s 1997 film Wilde saw Stephen Fry take on the eponymous role in a sweeping biopic slash drama which stretches over the last 18 years of his life. Beginning with his return to London from a trip to America and ripping speedily through his marriage to Jennifer Ehle’s kindly Constance and the birth of their two children, it is his relationship with family friend Robbie Ross that leads him into a world of sexual discovery. He finds there Jude Law’s impossibly handsome Lord Alfred ‘Bosie’ Douglas and falls head over heels into a tempestuous relationship, but in a society where homosexuality is illegal and propriety is everything, a happy ending is far from likely.

Fry makes an appealing Wilde, though one shorn of much of the acerbic nature one might imagine he had, he is a gentle father – telling his own story of The Selfish Giant acts as a clever layer of extra commentary – and he brings an almost avuncular warmth to the part. Jude Law’s Bosie is a revelation though, a serious reminder of his talents as an actor, with a capriciousness that is seductively alluring and yet criminally irresponsible. As Wilde seeks to lay the blame at the door of Bosie’s domineering father the Marquess of Queensbury, he ignores the knife-edge that their relationship is balanced on with devastating consequences. Continue reading “DVD Review: Wilde”

Review: Twelfth Night, Shakespeare’s Globe

“And all is semblative a woman’s part”

Mark Rylance’s much-trumpeted double-bill return to Shakespeare’s Globe this summer started with Richard III but it is now the turn of the belated second part to make its bow. Tim Carroll’s revival  of Twelfth Night, originally seen in 2002, largely uses the same all-male company and the same Original Practices approach of ‘doing it like it’s 1601’ for a short run – all sold out – before transferring into the West End. With a view to this, official press reviews will come from the Apollo rather than the Globe, so heaven know if this counts as a preview or not. Oh and in the interest of full disclosure and as heretical as it may be, I am not really a fan of Mark Rylance, just so you know. I do try to test my dislikes though, in the spirit of open-mindedness, something made much more palatable here by the £5 groundling tickets.

The choice of interpretation might strike a casual observer as typical for the Globe, even a little unimaginative, given the wide variety of Shakespearean re-imaginings on offer, but that would be underestimate the incredible level of detailed work that has gone on here at all levels. Liam Brennan imbues Orsino with a much greater deal of personality than is often granted to this lovesick Lord, making him a constant point of interest; Colin Hurley’s Sir Toby Belch reins in the boisterousness to construct a much more interesting character; Feste’s presence possesses an intriguing ambivalence in Peter Hamilton Dyer’s hands; and James Garnon makes one notice Fabian more than I’ve ever done before. Continue reading “Review: Twelfth Night, Shakespeare’s Globe”

DVD Review: Bright Young Things

“Reader, be glad that you have nothing to do with this world. Its glamour is a delusion, its speed a snare, its music a scream of fear.”

Whilst recently sitting through the 1930s-set play I Am A Camera at the Southwark Playhouse, I had that frustrating sensation of being reminded of a film that I couldn’t quite recall, mainly in the carefree attitudes of its lead characters. A post-show drink or three finally got me there, the film was Bright Young Things and so I popped it onto my Lovefilm list as it had been quite a while since I last saw it and I was keen for a rewatch.

Based on Evelyn Waugh’s novel Vile Bodies which written in 1930, the film marked the screenwriting and directorial debut of a certain Stephen Fry. Positioned as a satire on this section of society, the plot circles around a fast-living decadent set of aristocrats and bohemians living the high life of cocaine and champagne-fuelled parties completely divorced from the realities and responsibilities of the real world around them. Would-be novelist Adam Fenwick-Symes and party girl fiancée Nina Blount are the central couple whose wedding is forever being put off as he keeps losing the money for it, but the Jack and Karen in their lives – the Hon Agatha Runcible and the fey Miles – are much more fun. Continue reading “DVD Review: Bright Young Things”

Review: Soho Cinders, Soho Theatre

“It’s hard to tell the gay guys from the straight”

Technically speaking, Soho Cinders is a new musical. But given that some of the songs were first premiered at a Stiles + Drewe concert and subsequently released on CD and that the musical itself received a concert presentation late last year, it feels more like the return of an old friend. Though in the way that you can’t always control when friends come back into your life, this fable-like gay retelling of the Cinderella story was booked into the Soho Theatre in the middle of the summer.

Cinderella here is Robbie, a law student who works as an escort on the side and his Prince Charming is James Prince, a bisexual candidate in the London Mayoral race with whom he has been carrying out a clandestine affair. Anthony Drewe and Elliot Davis’ book retains much that will be recognised, like ugly stepsisters, but has also taken a bit of a spin on things, Buttons has become Velcro, the carriage becomes a Boris bike and the story has generally been modernised to cover the world of politics and sex scandals. Continue reading “Review: Soho Cinders, Soho Theatre”

Review: Howl’s Moving Castle, Southwark Playhouse

“I don’t cook! I’m a scary and powerful fire demon!”

Though not intended to be, this is a review of a preview. I was booked into the press night for Howl’s Moving Castle at the Southwark Playhouse but the creative team behind the show needed more time to work through some technical challenges and so the press night was delayed by a few days. My diary being what it is, I could not reschedule. This is the first stage adaptation of one of Diana Wynne Jones’ novels – though this was memorably animated by Studio Ghibli into a gorgeous film version – and director/designer team Davy and Kristin McGuire have taken a massive step up from their miniature theatre show The Icebook which combined paper cutouts with video work to create an exquisite pop-up book to create a full-scale festive show at the Southwark Playhouse. The ambition at work here is quite considerable and the initial impact of the design with its giant cut-out storybook castle is fantastic. And as the video work starts on the blank screens either side of the castle, it’s clear that this is something quite different.

It’s not a story that immediately springs to mind as one that could be transported onto the stage but Mize Sizemore’s adaptation is cleverly done, paring back the tale to just four characters. Sophie is an 18 year old girl working in a hat shop who unintentionally angers the Witch of the Waste who then casts a spell, turning her into an old woman. To try and break free, Sophie ends up in the home of mysterious wizard Howl, whose flying castle can move between time, space and all manner of dimensions but along this journey, she discovers that she is not the only one in need of rescue. Continue reading “Review: Howl’s Moving Castle, Southwark Playhouse”

2011 British Academy Television Awards nominations

Best Actor
Jim Broadbent – Any Human Heart as Logan Mountstuart (Channel 4)
Benedict Cumberbatch – Sherlock as Sherlock Holmes (BBC One)
Daniel Rigby – Eric and Ernie as Eric Morecambe (BBC Two)
Matt Smith – Doctor Who as The Doctor (BBC One)

Best Actress
Anna Maxwell Martin – South Riding as Sarah Burton (BBC One)
Vicky McClure – This is England ’86 as Lorraine “Lol” Jenkins (Channel 4)Natalie Press – Five Daughters as Paula Clennell (BBC One)
Juliet Stevenson – Accused : Helen’s Story as Helen Ryland (BBC One) Continue reading “2011 British Academy Television Awards nominations”

Review: Dick Whittington and his Cat, Lyric Hammersmith

“We just need someone to run London”

Dick Whittington and his Cat is the Lyric Hammersmith’s choice of pantomime this year with its ageless tale of a young boy making his way to London to find his fortune. Updating the story slightly to include all sorts of modern references and something of a street sensibility, it does a great job of observing the golden rule of pantomime of keeping its audience engaged and ensuring that the humour contained within hits on all levels, amusing young and old alike, working in slapstick, sight gags, silliness and a fair old bit of smut in Joel Horwood and Morgan Lloyd Malcolm’s excellent script.

There’s a steady flow of musical numbers, mainly up-to-the-minute pop songs like Jay-Z and Alicia Keys’ ‘Empire State of Mind’, Katy Perry’s ‘California Gurls’ and Glee’s ‘Don’t Stop Believin’’ featuring lyrical changes to make them London- and Hammersmith –specific. The best of them though is the genuinely funny take on Lady GaGa’s ‘Bad Romance’ by King Rat, Bad Rodent, which both excellently comic and creepy and it is nice to see the amount of effort that has gone into adapting all these songs in an integrated way into the show, rather than making them simple karaoke numbers. Continue reading “Review: Dick Whittington and his Cat, Lyric Hammersmith”

2010 British Academy Television Awards nominations

Actor
Kenneth Branagh — Wallander (BBC One)
Brendan Gleeson — Into the Storm (BBC Two)
John Hurt — An Englishman in New York (ITV)
David Oyelowo — Small Island (BBC One)

Actress
Helena Bonham Carter — Enid (BBC Four)
Sophie Okonedo — Mrs Mandela (BBC Four)
Julie Walters — A Short Stay in Switzerland (BBC One)
Julie Walters — Mo (Channel 4) Continue reading “2010 British Academy Television Awards nominations”

2009 British Academy Television Awards nominations

Best Actor
Stephen Dillane — The Shooting of Thomas Hurndall (Channel 4)
Jason Isaacs — The Curse of Steptoe (BBC Four)
Ken Stott — Hancock and Joan (BBC Four)
Ben Whishaw — Criminal Justice (BBC One)

Best Actress
June Brown — EastEnders (BBC One)
Anna Maxwell Martin — Poppy Shakespeare (Channel 4)
Maxine Peake — Hancock and Joan (BBC One)
Andrea Riseborough — Margaret Thatcher: The Long Walk to Finchley (BBC Four) Continue reading “2009 British Academy Television Awards nominations”