Mid February musical news

The producers of FIVER, the sell-out hit musical, which follows the dramatic journey of a five-pound note, are releasing a cast album in March. The album, titled Fiver (Live Concert Recording), is the product of three special, live streamed concert versions of the show, written by Alex James Ellison and Tom Lees, which played to a global audience in November 2020.

Featuring Dan Buckley, Aoife Clesham, Alex James Ellison,
Hiba Elchikhe and Luke Bayer, the album is available for pre-order now on iTunes and on CD and will be released on Friday 5 March. Continue reading “Mid February musical news”

Review: The Wedding Singer, Curve

“Pour a double gin,
here’s to your double chin”

Back when Adam Sandler was, you know, tolerable, he did rom-coms like 1998’s The Wedding Singer and where even moderately successful films go, musical theatre adaptations surely follow. Tim Herlihy adapts his own screenplay along with lyricist Chad Beguelin, and original music comes from Matthew Sklar, and the result is a perfectly competent piece of musical theatre which is fun without ever really being fantastic.

Opening at Leicester’s Curve ahead of a 8 month long UK tour (dates and venue at the end of this review), you can see where Nick Winston’s production has made its key decisions – Francis O’Connor’s set has its eye on quick get-outs and so Jack Henry’s video projections do a lot of the heavy lifting in setting the 80s milieu. And the casting mixes West End reliability with TV name recognition, the cherry on the cake of course being Ruth Madoc. Continue reading “Review: The Wedding Singer, Curve”

Review: 27, Cockpit Theatre

“The public will like whatever I tell them to like”

If only the public were so gullible… New rock musical 27 has nearly completed a substantial run at the Cockpit Theatre so I took my time to see it, knowing that many a show that has described itself as a rock musical has proven not to be my cup of tea. And thus it turned out with Sam Cassidy and Matt Wills’ 27, a mishmash of classical and modern myths that ends up something of an unholy mess.

At the forefront, just about, is the story of Orpheus, reinterpreted here for the modern world as wannabe rocker Jason (with a band called the Argonauts…) who does a Faustian deal with the devil for instant fame (see what I mean about those influences…) but ends up chasing through the underworld to rescue his girlfriend who has succumbed to a drug overdose.  Continue reading “Review: 27, Cockpit Theatre”