Film Review: Cats (2019)

Against a barrage of bad reviews, I tried to give Cats a fair hearing. There may have been wine involved…

“I remember the time I knew what happiness was”

I wanted to like Cats, honest. But…but…everytime you look at a detail in this unexpected horror film, there’s something ungainly or odd that distracts you inordinately:

  • the scale of the damn thing. The mind boggles as the cats change from being tiny compared to railway tracks to almost human-sized at Nelson’s Column, bringing almost any object into screen ends up pulling focus as you try and work out wtf is going on
  • why do some of them wear shoes (the ‘street’ cats in trainers, TSwift in heels…?) and of those who don’t, what’s with the toes
  • in fact the whole anthropomorphic thing. There’s cleavage and six packs but no genitals or anuses. You wouldn’t think it would bother you so much but there’s so many lingering shots of these places…! 
  • the dancing cockroaches in danger of being eaten. Whyyyyyyyy?!
  • it’s rather amusing that pretty much every reaction shot of Dench is her looking aghast, we know how you feel Judi

An unfortunate waste of talent all-round I’m afraid.

News: Cats trailer released

The only good thing to come out of the release of the trailer for the forthcoming movie adaptation of Cats is Twitter’s collective response

 

And if you must see the original for yourself…

 

Film Review: Molly’s Game 

“This is a true story, but except for my own, I’ve changed all the names and I’ve done my best to obscure identities for reasons that’ll become clear.”

Directed by Aaron Sorkin, Molly’s Game centers on the real-life memoirs of Molly Bloom, the “poker princess” who rubbed shoulders with Hollywood’s elite while hosting underground games in the basement of clubs and at the homes of her wealthy clients. It’s a poker movie that appeals to the masses, and while the action often takes place at the tables, it’s Molly’s life that is the focal point of the film.

Released in December 2017, Molly’s Game is a story of feminine power and ruthless intelligence, and any viewer who didn’t know better would think they were watching complete fiction. But director Sorkin, who won an Academy Award for directing The Social Network, as well as being well-known for screenwriting plays such as A Few Good Men, sticks closely to Bloom’s memoirs, in addition to drawing on his interviews. What we get is as close to an accurate account of Molly Bloom’s life, and even the seemingly sensationalized moments involving death threats from Russian mobsters draw right from Bloom’s own accounts. Continue reading “Film Review: Molly’s Game “

TV Review: Luther Series 5

Luther Series 5 aka the one that maybe goes too far?

“Can we do that?
‘Within parameters…'”

Not quite flogging a dead horse yet, but the much anticipated fifth series of Luther indulges its title character far too much  in the name of shocks and thrills, whilst simultaneously begging us not to misunderstand him, Nina Simone’s glorious voice plays out over the violent wreckage of the final scene.

As a crime drama, Neil Cross’ Luther really does manage to come up with inventively appalling serial killers and attackers that seem design to lurk in nightmares (the bus murder here…). But it is also increasingly tied up in the mythology of the show itself, the design here clearly aiming for some kind of apotheosis. Continue reading “TV Review: Luther Series 5”

2016 British Academy Television Awards nominations

Best Actor
Idris Elba – Luther as DCI John Luther (BBC One)
Stephen Graham – This Is England ’90 as Andrew “Combo” Gascoigne (Channel 4)
Mark Rylance – Wolf Hall as Thomas Cromwell (BBC Two)
Ben Whishaw – London Spy as Daniel “Danny” Edward Holt (BBC Two)

Best Actress
Claire Foy – Wolf Hall as Anne Boleyn (BBC Two)
Suranne Jones – Doctor Foster as Gemma Foster (BBC One)
Ruth Madeley – Don’t Take My Baby as Anna Watson (BBC Three)
Sheridan Smith – The C-Word as Lisa Lynch (BBC One) Continue reading “2016 British Academy Television Awards nominations”

22nd Screen Actors Guild Awards winners

Film
Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role
Leonardo DiCaprio – The Revenant as Hugh Glass
Bryan Cranston – Trumbo as Dalton Trumbo
Johnny Depp – Black Mass as James “Whitey” Bulger
Michael Fassbender – Steve Jobs as Steve Jobs
Eddie Redmayne – The Danish Girl as Lili Elbe / Einar Wegener

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Brie Larson – Room as Joy “Ma” Newsome
Cate Blanchett – Carol as Carol Aird
Helen Mirren – Woman in Gold as Maria Altmann
Saoirse Ronan – Brooklyn as Eilis Lacey
Sarah Silverman – I Smile Back as Elaine “Laney” Brooks Continue reading “22nd Screen Actors Guild Awards winners”

6th Critics’ Choice Television Awards winners

Best Series
Best Comedy Series
Master of None (Netflix)
Black-ish (ABC)
Catastrophe (Amazon Video)
Jane the Virgin (The CW)
The Last Man on Earth (Fox)
Transparent (Amazon Video)
You’re the Worst (FX)

Best Drama Series
Mr. Robot (USA)
Empire (Fox)
The Knick (Cinemax)
The Leftovers (HBO)
Penny Dreadful (Showtime)
Rectify (Sundance)
UnREAL (Lifetime) Continue reading “6th Critics’ Choice Television Awards winners”

69th British Academy Film Awards nominations

BAFTA Fellowship
Sidney Poitier

Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema
Angels Costumes

Best Film
The Big Short – Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner and Brad Pitt
Bridge of Spies – Kristie Macosko Krieger, Marc Platt and Steven Spielberg
Carol – Elizabeth Karlsen, Christine Vachon and Stephen Woolley
The Revenant – Steve Golin, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Arnon Milchan, Mary Parent and Keith Redmon
Spotlight – Blye Pagon Faust, Steve Golin, Nicole Rocklin and Michael Sugar Continue reading “69th British Academy Film Awards nominations”