Album Reviews: Amélie The Musical / Cases / After You

A trio of cast recording reviews covers musicals Amélie The Musical, Cases and After You – each one a winner in its own way

“I have always thought I’d see the world”

© Pamela Raith Photography

True story, listening to the cast recording of Amélie The Musical for the first time last summer caused the biggest eruption of tears I’d had all pandemic long. It’s a show I’ve loved from the Watermill Theatre, to its UK tour and thence to The Other Palace, and none of its charm has been lost onto its move onto record here (it has been released on CD as of 1st April). Daniel Messé’s score and his lyrics with Nathan Tysen are charmant in the extreme, embracing the quirkiness of the central character but rooting her in a deep emotional truth of social awkwardness. Audrey Brisson was deservedly nominated for an Olivier and leads the ensemble beautifully, Chris Jared and Caolan McCarthy taking moments to shine too. And I swaer, if there’s another 79 seconds that is as achingly gorgeous as ‘How To Tell Time’, I will manger mon béret. Continue reading “Album Reviews: Amélie The Musical / Cases / After You”

Review: Amélie the Musical, The Other Palace

Not too much more to say about Amélie the Musical, now in London at The Other Palace, other than book now for un moment merveilleux 

“Will there be time to keep on dreaming once this dream is over?”

In what has felt like an inordinately long year, Amélie the Musical captured my heart a long time ago. It was April to be precise, when this beautiful actor-musician show debuted in the gorgeous intimacy of the Watermill and then as it set off on a UK tour, I couldn’t help but go back a month later for second helpings, which I enjoyed just as much. So could I resist a third trip after a London residency was booked in at The Other Palace? What do you think…?!

First off, it feels great to finally see The Other Palace fulfilling the actual need that exists in London theatre but one which is rarely met, in providing a mid-size home for touring musicals, allowing them to establish a foothold here without the pressures of filling a West End house just yet. It helps that Michael Fentiman’s production of Amélie the Musical was originally conceived en bijou but this just feels like the right home for it, right now. Continue reading “Review: Amélie the Musical, The Other Palace”

Review: Amélie the Musical, New Wimbledon Theatre

As sweet-sharp as a diabolo grenadine, the touring version of Amélie the Musical impresses me at the New Wimbledon Theatre

“Will there troubles?
I don’t know
Will there be sweet things?
I hope so”

As sweet-sharp as a diabolo grenadine, Amélie the Musical has lost none of its inimitable charm as it gears up for a considerable UK tour. I adored it at the Watermill but the intimacy there left me wondering how the show would fare in the significantly larger houses to which it will be touring. Turns out I need not have worried.

Michael Fentiman’s production has expanded perfectly to fill the space. A few more ensemble members here, a tweak to Madeleine Girling’s canny set design there, and the show has lost nothing of itself or its kooky Parisian whirl. If anything the actor-muso ensemble’s reinterpretation of Daniel Messé’s score sounds even better than before under George Francis’ musical direction. Continue reading “Review: Amélie the Musical, New Wimbledon Theatre”

Review: Pope Joan – National Youth Theatre of Great Britain at St James’s Church Piccadilly

“Something is happening, something ungodly”

Thickly pungent clouds of incense, masses of supernumeraries dressed as glowering monks, the plaintive drone of the organ interrupted only by the dramatic peals of the church bells – there could hardly be a more atmospheric venue for the National Youth Theatre of Great Britain to launch their autumn season. And in Louise Brealey’s debut play Pope Joan, the ecclesiastical setting of St James’s Church in Piccadilly gains an especial resonance given that even now, over 1000 years since the apocryphal medieval story took place, the Church still doesn’t know how to deal with women. 

Brealey, perhaps unfairly best known as the wretched Molly in Sherlock, has alighted on the ninth century legend of the only woman ever to have (allegedly) become pope and used it to explore the uneasy interface between gender and religion, the way in which the patriarchy has assumed dominance over society and will do anything to protect, and also the journey of one person’s faith and their struggle to be able to pursue it as their spirit dictates. Continue reading “Review: Pope Joan – National Youth Theatre of Great Britain at St James’s Church Piccadilly”