Not-a-review: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Wiltshire Creative

I should have been going to Salisbury this weekend to see Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at Wiltshire Creative so what to do instead? Read about it and the ways to help the theatres involved

“Dashed hopes and good intentions…”

I’ve long been a fan of David Mercatali’s directing (find an interview with him here) so I was determined to fit in a visit to his production of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, a co-production between Bristol’s Tobacco Factory and Wiltshire Creative (the Salisbury Playhouse as was).

That didn’t happen as my trip was scheduled towards the end of the second half of the run but in some small mercy, the production did get most of the way through its Bristol leg which means there’s all sorts to read about it, which the Tobacco Factory has kindly collated here.

By comparison, the Brit-heavy Broadway revival, starring Laurie Metcalf, Rupert Everett, Russell Tovey and Patsy Ferran barely managed a week of previews before having to close. 

For the Tobacco Factory
You can follow the theatre on Twitter here
You can look at ways of supporting the theatre via this page here

For Wiltshire Creative
You can follow the theatre on Twitter here
You can look at ways of supporting the theatre via this page here

And there’s a trailer 

July theatre round-up

I might have taken a break from reviewing for the last couple of months, but I didn’t stop going to the theatre. Here’s some brief thoughts on most of what I saw  in July.

On Your Feet, aka the rhythm will get you, sometimes
the end of history…, aka how can you get cheese on toast so wrong
Equus, aka hell yes for Jessica Hung Han Yun’s lighting design
Games for Lovers, aka straight people be crazy
Captain Corelli’s Mandolin, aka the one that got my goat
The Girl on the Train, aka Philip McGinley in shorts
A Midsummer Night’s Dream, aka Another Dream? dream on
Uncle Vanya, aka I really need to stop booking for plays like this with casts like that 
Jellyfish, aka justice for the second best play of last year
Sweat, aka Clare Perkins should always be on in the West End
Sue Townsend’s The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4 The Musical, aka yay for lovely new musicals in the West End
The Light in the Piazza, aka Molly Lynch fricking nails it
Jesus Christ Superstar, aka was third time the charm?
Continue reading “July theatre round-up”

London Film Critics Circle Awards 2018 winners

Film of the Year
Roma
BlacKkKlansman
Cold War
The Favourite
First Man
First Reformed
The Happy Prince
Leave No Trace
Shoplifters
You Were Never Really Here

Director of the Year
Alfonso Cuaron – Roma
Debra Granik – Leave No Trace
Yorgos Lanthimos – The Favourite
Pawel Pawlikowski – Cold War
Lynne Ramsay – You Were Never Really Here Continue reading “London Film Critics Circle Awards 2018 winners”

London Film Critics Circle Awards 2018 nominees

Film of the Year
BlacKkKlansman
Cold War
The Favourite
First Man
First Reformed
The Happy Prince
Leave No Trace
Roma
Shoplifters

You Were Never Really Here

Director of the Year
Alfonso Cuaron – Roma
Debra Granik – Leave No Trace
Yorgos Lanthimos – The Favourite
Pawel Pawlikowski – Cold War
Lynne Ramsay – You Were Never Really Here Continue reading “London Film Critics Circle Awards 2018 nominees”

2018 British Independent Film Awards nominations

Best British Independent Film
The Favourite – Yorgos Lanthimos, Deborah Davis, Tony McNamara, Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney and Lee Magiday
American Animals – Bart Layton, Katherine Butler, Dimitri Doganis, Derrin Schlesinger and Mary Jane Skalski
Beast – Michael Pearce, Kristian Brodie, Lauren Dark and Ivana Mackinnon
Disobedience – Sebastián Lelio, Rebecca Lenkiewicz, Ed Guiney, Frida Torresblanco and Rachel Weisz
You Were Never Really Here – Lynne Ramsay, Pascal Caucheteux, Rosa Attab, James Wilson and Rebecca O’Brien

Best Director
Yorgos Lanthimos – The Favourite
Andrew Haigh – Lean on Pete
Bart Layton – American Animals
Michael Pearce – Beast
Lynne Ramsay – You Were Never Really Here Continue reading “2018 British Independent Film Awards nominations”

News: Old Vic bicentenary ambassadors announced

How do you mark a significant birthday? My parents are currently (jointly) turning 140 and are celebrating the occasion with a six month program of events, peaking with an all-day party happening very soon. But if you’re the Old Vic and you’re turning 200, you open your contacts and see who is free.

Turns out a fair few people are, and so their list currently includes Nikki Amuka-Bird, Sheila Atim, John Boyega, Cate Blanchett, Bertie Carvel, Kim Cattrall, Lily Cole, Alan Cumming, Judi Dench, Michelle Dockery, Rupert Everett, Martin Freeman, Tamsin Greig, David Harewood, Derek Jacobi, Toby Jones, Cush Jumbo, Ben Kingsley, Pearl Mackie, Helen McCrory, Ian McKellen, Bill Nighy, Anika Noni Rose, Maxine Peake, Mark Rylance, Andrew Scott, Tom Stoppard, Stanley Tucci and Julie Walters.

Continue reading “News: Old Vic bicentenary ambassadors announced”

12 Days of Christmas – Black Mirror 1:2

“Everything’s just a bit wider apart”

On the second day of Christmas, Black Mirror gave to me…two lovelorn kids

Fifteen Million Merits takes place in a fiercely satirical version of our entertainment culture, where appearing on reality TV is king and everyone else is trapped in a factory-like environment where they must cycle for hours on end to generate all the electricity needed. Forced to watch inane crap on the screens that constantly surround them, their activities are frequently interrupted by adverts, just like on the Channel 4 player!

Daniel Kaluuya’s Bing has inherited 15 million merits from his brother on his passing and decides to use them to enter Jessica Brown Findlay’s Abi into Hot Shots, the X Factor-like show with a scarily vacuous Julia Davis and a sinister Cowell-a-like Rupert Everett. This is the only route out of their slave-like existence but sure enough, nothing is as simple as it seems and as ever, you have to be careful what you wish for. Continue reading “12 Days of Christmas – Black Mirror 1:2”

DVD Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1999)

“A part of love as dreams, sighs, wishes, and tears”

Perhaps taking influence from the roaring success of Kenneth Branagh’s sun-soaked Much Ado About Nothing, Michael Hoffman saw Hollywood’s return to Shakespeare transplant A Midsummer Night’s Dream to a luscious nineteenth century Tuscan setting. So Athens becomes the town of Monte Athena and the soundtrack is suffused with the strains of Verdi, Donizetti and Bellini but in many other respects, it’s a fairly traditional interpretation – a plethora of bicycles aside.

And though it might not seem that big of a deal, it is indicative of Hoffman’s initial approach to tinker where tinkering is not needed. So the heart sinks as the lovers’ comic business is rough-handled onto two wheels and Nick Bottom gains a (mute) wife, but spirits soon rise again as the film begins to trust the text and just enjoy itself. Calista Flockhart proves a revelation as a genuinely emotionally bruised Helena, chasing Christian Bale’s disinterested Demetrius and fending off Dominic West’s magically enhanced interest, much to Anna Friel’s Hermia’s chagrin. Continue reading “DVD Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1999)”