Review: Andy Capp The Musical, Finborough

“I ought to be ashamed of myself”

So sings Andy Capp throughout his eponymous turn in Andy Capp The Musical, a knowing nod to thoroughly misogynistic nature of the character and its unremitting political incorrectness. And it is this that emerges as the strangest thing about making a musical out of him, rather than the fact that it is based on a feather-light comic strip by Reg Smythe that has long blessed the pages of the Daily Mirror. For the show emerges as something really rather charming, even whilst Capp remains thoroughly unreconstructed.

A workshy native of Hartlepool, where he’s managed over 30 years without a job, Capp chooses instead to rely on wife Flo’s earnings for his considerable beer money, lavishing more attention on his racing pigeons than her. With illustrated stories that are generally just three panels long, Trevor Peacock’s book thus has to open out the story to the friends and neighbours around them, counterpointing a flashpoint of marital strife with the forthcoming nuptials of Capp’s nephew Elvis and the lovely Raquel. And this it does well. Continue reading “Review: Andy Capp The Musical, Finborough”

Review: The Crucible, Old Vic

“An everlasting funeral marches round your heart”

On paper, this latest incarnation of The Crucible at the Old Vic may seem everlasting – early previews hit four hours and with no change to the 7.30pm starting time, it may feel like an endurance test in the making. But settled in at just under 3 hours 30 minutes, Yaël Farber’s production emerges as a slow-burning success, much in the vein of the Streetcar up the road in being utterly unafraid to take its time to build up the requisite atmosphere of horrifying suspicion and fear that renders Arthur Miller’s play a striking and timeless triumph.
 

And creatively it really is a triumph – Soutra Gilmour utilising the in-the-round setting perfectly whilst Richard Hammarton’s pervasive music and sound wriggle under the skin and Tim Lutkin’s lighting creates as much shadow as it does light, all combining to heighten the increasingly nightmarish scenario as the action snowballs to the terrible climax we know must come. The immediacy and intimacy that comes from being much closer than usual (for the vast majority in this theatre anyway) is almost unbearable but completely justifies keeping the theatre in this configuration for a while longer.

Continue reading “Review: The Crucible, Old Vic”