Some early October theatre news

Theatre503 has announced the cast for Milk and Gall, the debut play by 2018 Theatre503 International Playwriting Award finalist Mathilde Dratwa. Directed by Theatre503 Artistic Director Lisa Spirling (Wolfie), the cast is led by MyAnna Buring (The Witcher – Netflix, A Very Expensive Poison – Old Vic) as Vera, alongside the double Olivier Award winning Jenny Galloway (Mamma Mia, The Boys From Syracuse) as Barbara, with Matt Whitchurch (Spiderfly –Theatre503, Pride & Prejudice – Nottingham Playhouse) as Michael, Sherine Chalhie as Amira, and Tracy-Anne Green as Alexa.

Milk and Gall exposes the messy reality of new motherhood in the shadow of one of the most divisive moments in modern American history. It is a theatrically dazzling, surreal and funny new play about the overnight birth of two screaming tyrants, and the shattered identity left in their wake. Continue reading “Some early October theatre news”

Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Liverpool Everyman

“We will make amends ere long”

After The Faction’s Romeo and Juliet that stretched out beyond the three hour mark, here’s a version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream that is similarly lengthy – I’m really hoping this isn’t the emergence of a trend because it does no good to anyone in all honesty. Notions of textual fidelity are all well and good but they can also lack dramatic focus – the ever-evolving mutability of Shakespeare’s text is one of its key strengths and it is a mark of directorial nous to be able to harness that potential and deliver it onstage (and if it is going to be long, then it needs not to feel long).

But here, for every innovation that Nick Bagnall comes up with for his production at the Everyman in Liverpool – and there are many of them – there’s an overcooked scene that drags unbearably. It makes for an occasionally difficult piece of theatre but one that also has imaginatively exciting moments too. Ashley Martin-Davis’ design also embodies this conflict in its amorphous undefinability, no particular time or place evoked but rather a vaguely futuristic, dark carnival-esque atmosphere for an unfamiliar Athens and a strange forest of scattered white paper that is a great idea but not quite pulled off. Continue reading “Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Liverpool Everyman”