Fed up with football? World Cup theatre offers

“Football crazy, football mad”

The World Cup kicks off on Thursday 12th June in São Paolo and will run for a goodly month as 64 games are played throughout Brazil (I’m tipping Bosnia and Colombia to do well, and Rooney to get sent off in his first game). Television and work schedules will be all askew as people try and wrestle with the time difference so the people at Theatre People have teamed up with a starting squad of West End stars to highlight a month of offers and discounts to wide range of shows which offer an alternative to sitting in and watching men in shorts on telly.  Continue reading “Fed up with football? World Cup theatre offers”

Re-review: Let The Right One In, Royal Court

“I know how good you are to me. I’m grateful”

An unexpected revisit to Let The Right One In, especially since I’d seen it just three days before but @pcchan1981 had a spare £10 ticket going and so I offered myself up as his last resort, happy indeed to have the chance see it again at the Royal Court, ahead of a rumoured West End transfer (the presence of Bill Kenwright as a co-producer suggesting this isn’t as unlikely as it may seem). Original review is here and I can’t really offer up any new insights rather than to say try your best to see it now as it flows beautifully in the relative intimacy of the Royal Court and the awesome staging of the penultimate scene might get lost in a West End house.

Running time: 2 hours 20 minutes (with interval) 
Booking until 21st December

Review: Let The Right One In, Royal Court

“Would you still like me if I turned out to not be a girl?”

Adapted by Jack Thorne from John Ajvide Lindqvist’s novel and its two subsequent film versions, Let The Right One In could be said to fall into the teen vampire genre that has proved so enduringly popular of late, but that would do a huge disservice to all concerned, not least with this National Theatre of Scotland and Royal Court co-production. As two youngsters neglected by society cling onto each other to avoid falling through the cracks in a snow-swept Swedish town where a serial killer appears to be on the loose, they discover that one is not quite like the other…

Directed by John Tiffany with long-time associate Steven Hoggett by his side, the show produces moment after moment of elegiac beauty interspersed with the harsh brutality of real life which intrudes like jagged breaths of wintry air. Hoggett’s unmistakeable physical language is sparingly but beautifully deployed, the strangeness of situation enhanced through movement and Ólafur Arnalds’ score swoops with plangent intensity, underscoring many of the show’s most powerful sequences. Accompanied by Gareth Fry’s evocative sound design, the production constantly teeters on an anticipatory edge, toying with the film’s horror origins but converting it to a more fitting level of suspense for the stage. Continue reading “Review: Let The Right One In, Royal Court”