Review: The Chemsex Monologues, King’s Head Theatre

“He was wandering around topless, clearly drug-fucked, asking random guys to have sex. I took his hand and he grabbed me urgently, blue eyes intent and blazing.”

Patrick Cash’s The HIV Monologues slayed me last year so the opportunity to see another of his plays with Dragonflies Theatre was not one I wanted to pass up. The Chemsex Monologues did great business at the King’s Head last year and with that venue’s current tendency towards extremely LGBT-friendly material, it has made an unsurprising return here. Directed by Luke Davies, Cash’s storytelling winds together the tales of four people engaged – to varying degrees – in London’s chemsex scene. 

For the uninitiated – it’s a gay subculture where guys get high and have sex with each other, but as post-club chillout parties have been transformed by harder and harder drugs, it has become a world not without its challenges. And without judgement, without condemnation, The Chemsex Monologues gives a real insight into the ways in which people get drawn in. A sexual health worker feeling lonely, a guy who can’t believe his luck at pulling the fittest guy in the club and unwilling to let the night end, a faithful fag hag, a pretty boy with insecurities – anyone, everyone?  Continue reading “Review: The Chemsex Monologues, King’s Head Theatre”

Review: Cover Her Face, Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club

“In what a shadow or deep pit of darkness doth womanish and fearful mankind live”

Gemma Arterton may have the part of the willowy ingénue down pat in The Duchess of Malfi at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse just now but over in the earthier environment of the Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club, something much more radical is happening. Cover Her Face is a new version of John Webster’s 1613 work which relocates the play to the queer subculture of 1950s London, Malfi being the club at the centre of the scene, and third gender writer/performer La JohnJoseph its transgender Duchess.

Daniel Fulvio and Martin Moriarty’s reworking for Inky Cloak is a bold move but one which pays richly evocative rewards. The shifting of the narrative onto a trans focus possesses an aching urgency – JohnJoseph’s Duchess longing for love and marriage and the freedom to live as a woman, yet cruelly constrained by the conservatism of her two brothers – malevolent twin Ferdinand and the closeted Minister. Their uneasy arrangement is shattered though by arrival of the handsome Antonio. with predictably tragic consequences. Continue reading “Review: Cover Her Face, Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club”