TV Review: Man in an Orange Shirt

I end up a little disappointed after an excellent first half of Man in an Orange Shirt

“You didn’t think we could set up home together like man and wife?”

I wanted to love Man in an Orange Shirt , I really did. A BBC two-part mini-series from 2017, it was written by Patrick Gale using elements from his own family history. And featuring a cast that is both suitably impressive -James McArdle, Vanessa Redgrave – and pretty – newcomers to me Julian Morris and Oliver Jackson-Cohen.

The first half is by far the stronger. Set in the 1940s, old schoolmates Michael and Thomas find themselves stationed together in WWII Italy. An unexpected connection blooms between the pair and once war is over, Michael searches out Thomas and they spend a blissful weekend together. Only trouble is, Michael also has to eventually reunite with his fiancée too. Continue reading “TV Review: Man in an Orange Shirt”

The 2016 Ian Charleson Award

The Ian Charleson Awards are theatrical awards that reward the best classical stage performances in Britain by actors under age 30. The awards are named in memory of the renowned British actor Ian Charleson, and are run by the Sunday Times newspaper and the National Theatre. 

The nominees for 2016 have been announced and the winners will be announced on 5th June:

 
First Prize

Paapa Essiedu, for Hamlet; and Edmund, King Lear (RSC)

Second Prize

Jessica Brown Findlay, for Sonya, Uncle Vanya (Almeida)

Third Prize

Fisayo Akinade, for The Dauphin, Saint Joan (Donmar)

Commendations

James Corrigan, for Palamon, The Two Noble Kinsmen (RSC)
Emma Curtis, for The Lady, Comus (Globe)
Marcus Griffiths, for Laertes, Hamlet (RSC)
Felicity Huxley-Miners, for Elena Popova, The Bear (London Theatre, New Cross)
Francesca Mills, for Maria, The Government Inspector (Ramps on the Moon/Birmingham Rep)
Natalie Simpson, for Cordelia, King Lear; Ophelia, Hamlet; and Guideria, Cymbeline (RSC)
Ewan Somers, for Claudio, Much Ado About Nothing (Dundee Rep)
Marli Siu, for Hero, Much Ado About Nothing (Dundee Rep)
Joanna Vanderham, for Queen Anne, Richard III (Almeida)
Paksie Vernon, for Sylvia Craven, The Philanderer (Orange Tree Theatre)

Shakespeare Solos – Part 1

“But I do think it is their husbands’ faults if wives do fall”

There’s going to be a lot of Shakespearean content coming our way in the next couple of months as we approach the 400th anniversary of his death and the Guardian have got in early with the first part of their Shakespeare Solos. Six leading actors performing favourite monologues from the Bard, directed by Dan Susman, it’s all rather luxurious, especially when we get the delights of Eileen Atkins in beautifully conversational mode as Othello’s Emilia, Adrian Lester returning to Hamlet and Roger Allam whetting the appetite for a King Lear which will surely be one of the wonders of the modern world once it happens.

And if a couple of the choices here smack a little of sneaky advertising, then so what. Better to have opportunities for people to book and see more if they are so inspired by these clips. Atkins is reprising her solo show at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse and Ayesha Dharker (here as Titania) will open in the RSC’s mammoth tour of A Midsummer Night’s Dream later this month. It might not be Hamlet but Adrian Lester can be seen being differently Shakespearean in Red Velvet and most tenuously of all though still thoroughly theatrical, David Morrissey (a hypnotic Richard III) can be seen for another month in Hangmen.

Review: The Dazzle, Found111

“Tragedy is when a few people sink to the level of where most people always are”

For all the trumpeting of the finding a new theatrical space at Found111 – the former Central St Martins School of Art building at 111 Charing Cross Road where The Dazzle is playing – I’ll tell you what they haven’t found, a half-decent pre-theatre experience. It’s all very well cultivating a hipsterish air with your pop-up bar and swanky cocktails but at the point when over 100 theatregoers are being corralled into a space which barely fits them, with no FOH controlling the crowd or at least guiding them into a queue as there’s unreserved seating to boot, it makes for a deeply unpleasant beginning to the evening.

And given that ticket prices are £35 (the earlybird £10 seats have long gone though day seats are being released from 6pm each night) it’s a shoddy way to do business and one which fails to recognise that for many, the show starts long before the curtain rises. After the crushing rush to get into the actual theatre, it was hard not to be a little underwhelmed by the space – there’s nothing that particularly commends it to theatrical use and certainly nothing that pertains to the play in question, so it’s a little baffling as to why the Michael Grandage Company and Emily Dobbs Productions chose it in lieu of one of London’s many, many theatres.  Continue reading “Review: The Dazzle, Found111”