TV Review: The Good Fight Series 3

Michael Sheen does his best to destabilise Series 3 of The Good Fight but Christine Baranski and Audra McDonald just about pull it back

“Don’t get in the way of someone kicking ass”

For a season that contains the wonder that is Christine Baranski and Audra McDonald casually duetting on ‘Raspberry Beret’, Series 3 of The Good Fight ends up being something of a challenge. The presence of Michael Sheen’s Mephistophelian Roland Blum was clearly meant to shake things up but that chaotic energy ends up being destabilising.

Which is a shame, as so much of what makes The Good Fight click so well is present here. Topics ripped from up-to-the-minute headlines, including voter suppression, racial profiling, Karens calling the polices, troll farms, historic sexual harassment cases, Kim and Kanye… And they’re all treated sensitively but still daringly in some bold storytelling. Continue reading “TV Review: The Good Fight Series 3”

Review: Pete ‘n’ Keely, Tristan Bates

“It’s us again”

Emily Bestow’s technicolor set design for Pete ‘n’ Keely is one of those which fully exploits the transformative possibilities of the Tristan Bates’ black box, converting the space into a convincing evocation of a swingin’ Sixties television studio. That studio is currently home to pop duo Pete Bartel and Keely Stevens who soared up the charts with their winning charm and captured the hearts of a nation when they got married. Five years down the line though, fame has cooled, they’re divorced and the first time they’ve met up since, they’re filming a live reunion special on TV.

Thus we get a variety show format that allows the pair to fill us in anecdotally on their shared past through the medium of popular song, at least when their barely concealed present animosity doesn’t interfere. For there’s a multitude of unresolved issues that need to be dealt with if they’re to make it to the end of the programme, never mind consider the future beyond it. Appropriately enough for the era, Pete ‘n’ Keely is a rather gentle show and Matthew Gould’s production here possesses a warmly nostalgic glow that is well essayed by performers David Bardsley and Katie Kerr. Continue reading “Review: Pete ‘n’ Keely, Tristan Bates”