TV Review: The Crimson Petal and the White

A strong cast can’t persuade me about literary adaptation The Crimson Petal and the White

“Here, people go to sleep as soon as the gin takes effect”

This TV adaptation of Michael Faber’s 2002 novel dates back to 2011 but despite having the kind of cast that normally attracts me like a moth to a flame, I never quite got round to watching The Crimson Petal and the White. And in all honesty, I should have stuck with my initial sixth sense…

Set in the seedy underbelly of Victorian London, the story follows Romola Garai’s courtesan Sugar and the relationship she develops with feckless perfume heir William Rackham, a persuasive Chris O’Dowd. From a flop of a first night, he soon becomes entirely infatuated with her, not letting the fact that he has a mentally ill wife get in the way. Continue reading “TV Review: The Crimson Petal and the White”

Review: I’m Not Jesus Christ, Theatre N16 at Wandsworth Arts Fringe

“I’m the Schumacher of storytelling”

There aren’t too many opportunities to see a bit of Romanian theatre in London so from the start, Papercut Theatre’s production of Maria Manolescu’s I’m Not Jesus Christ is fascinating. Part of a bit of ambitious programming at this year’s Wandsworth Arts Fringe festival, it is playing at the Theatre N16, currently residing at the Bedford pub in Balham

Developed and translated during the International Residency at the Royal Court in 2007, I’m Not Jesus Christ is based on an unlikely but real life story. Michael Schumacher super-fan and 11-year-old Mihai decides to celebrate his upcoming birthday by getting a prostitute, an encounter that goes disastrously wrong when his mother Maria comes home early.  Continue reading “Review: I’m Not Jesus Christ, Theatre N16 at Wandsworth Arts Fringe”

Review: Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens, Criterion Theatre

“Learning to let go”

Just a quickie for this one-off – a fundraiser for the Make A Difference Trust of this late 1980s song cycle inspired by the AIDS memorial quilt. The original London production of Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens actually transferred to the Criterion – where tonight’s show was – from the King’s Head but it’s a little difficult to see how this production with its nearly 50-strong company could ever have been scaled down to fit into that Islington pub theatre. But given how the show is made up of individual songs and monologues, each inspired by a different panel on the quilt representing the life of someone who has died from HIV/AIDS, its inherent flexibility shows how it can take whatever form is needed.

Here, Stephen Whitson’s production takes on a new 21st century version of the book by Bill Russell, the updating of which has mixed results. Contemporary references clang a little awkwardly but there’s more of a problem in that neither the fast-moving world of medical advancements nor the changing nature of the epidemic itself are really reflected – the show is already a period piece in so many ways that it perhaps would be better to leave it that way rather than trying to chase a relevance that would be better served by a completely separate part two. Continue reading “Review: Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens, Criterion Theatre”