Album Reviews: Here for You: Ballads for Broadway Impact / My Lifelong Love / Infinite Joy: The Songs of William Finn

This trio of album reviews covers Here for You: Ballads for Broadway Impact, My Lifelong Love and Infinite Joy: The Songs of William Finn

“People are swell but I’d rather be sailing”

Released in 2013 in support of Broadway Impact, an organisation of theatre artists and fans mobilised in support of marriage equality, Here for You: Ballads for Broadway Impact is a powerful collection of songs from Jonathan Reid Gealt. It is no secret that I love a ballad and having the likes of Kelli O’Hara, Adrienne Warren and Jeremy Jordan crooning and belting like this is just heaven. Jordan’s elegiac ‘Here For You’ with its gentle guitar is superb, as is the passion of Warren on ‘Home Away From Home’ but the standout track for me is O’Hara’s powerfully moving ‘Breathe’. Continue reading “Album Reviews: Here for You: Ballads for Broadway Impact / My Lifelong Love / Infinite Joy: The Songs of William Finn”

Nominations for 2014-2015 Outer Critics Circle Awards

John Gassner Playwriting Award (Presented for an American play, preferably by a new playwright)
Ayad Akhtar, The Invisible Hand
Halley Feiffer, I’m Gonna Pray For You So Hard
Elizabeth Irwin, My Mañana Comes
Markus Potter, Stalking the Bogeyman
Benjamin Scheuer, The Lion

Outstanding Actor in a Musical
Christian Borle, Something Rotten!
Brian d’Arcy James, Something Rotten!
Robert Fairchild, An American in Paris
Peter Gallagher, On the Twentieth Century
Tony Yazbeck, On the Town Continue reading “Nominations for 2014-2015 Outer Critics Circle Awards”

Album Review: Out Of Our Heads – The Music of Kooman and Dimond

“I’m not like the other girls in the show”  

Albums that are made up of selections from the catalogue of musical theatre writers, as opposed to straight soundtracks, tend to fit into a generally similar format, as my experience of listening to quite a few this year has borne out. And by and large, I can tell whether I am going to like it the album on the strength of the comedy song – for there is always a comedy song – and sure enough, when it came to Out Of Our Heads – The Music of Kooman and Dimond (alt iTunes link here), so this rule came to pass. Pleasingly enough, that song – Random Black Girl – comes in as the second track and is an absolute corker both musically tight and lyrically hilarious and thus overall, I really enjoyed the album.

Michael Kooman and Christopher Dimond are something of an up and coming pair of US musical theatre writers with a handful of shows to their names – Golden Gate, Dani Girl and Homemade Fusion – that have been bubbling under whilst they build up their name and reputation. They seem on the right track as this CD, a selection of their songs, features a line-up of exciting Broadway, including at least one name that should be familiar to UK theatre-goers in the fabulous (baby) Patina Miller who headed up Sister Act here and is reprising the role back over the ocean. Continue reading “Album Review: Out Of Our Heads – The Music of Kooman and Dimond”

Album Review: Keys – The Music of Scott Alan

“You can hear the birds migrating
Through the sky lit autumn dawn”

Keys – The Music of Scott Alan is the second album of this American composer’s work, the first Dreaming Wide Awake becoming a fast favourite and so I was quite keen to start working my way through his other CDs. This album, which was produced by composer Alan, features orchestrations and arrangements penned by James Abbott, Barbara Anselmi, Sam Davis, Tom Kitt and Jesse Vargas which are heavy on piano and strings which instantly scores brownie points for me as it makes the album sound so much classier from the off and suggests that a timelessness that can never be achieved with an overly synthesised approach.
 
The calibre of performer Alan can attract is really quite seriously impressive especially considering there’s no real hit show to his name yet, but this is just testament to the quality of the song-writing. One assumes these songs are being written for shows but I suspect part of the reason for his appeal is that they stand alone so very well and so make ideal inclusions for cabarets. Whether it is veterans like Norm Lewis, purring silkily through ‘How Did I End Up Here’ and Sutton Foster’s gorgeously restrained ‘Always’, or the comparative young guns of Caissie Levy with her driving ballad ‘Please Don’t Let Me Go’ and Hadley Fraser’s impassioned ‘Again’, there’s a great sense of natural ease about this recording.

Continue reading “Album Review: Keys – The Music of Scott Alan”