Review: Women, Power and Politics: Now, Tricycle

“Why would anyone go into politics unless it is to speak up for those who can’t speak up for themselves?”

Women, Power and Politics: Now is one half of a larger programme of activities by the Tricycle looking at the role of women in power and politics to try and find an answer to the persistent under-representation of women in the corridors of power in the UK. Taking its example from last year’s The Great Game, a number of playwrights have been commissioned to create short plays from a range of perspectives and stories and performed by a large ensemble of 12. This half looks at things from a modern perspective whereas Then takes a set of historical viewpoints, you should note the two evenings can be enjoyed separately and do not have to be viewed in chronological order.

Directed by Indhu Rubasingham, Now features five short plays, Acting Leader by Joy Wilkinson, The Panel by Zinnie Harris, Playing the Game by Bola Agbaje, Pink by Sam Holcroft and You, Me and Wii by Sue Townsend, fuller reviews of each play can be read by clicking on the links in the titles. There’s a number of common themes that emerge from the evening, in particular the rise of the pursuit of individual gain over the collective good and the prevalence of voter apathy for a range of reasons. Continue reading “Review: Women, Power and Politics: Now, Tricycle”

Review: Women, Power and Politics: Then, Tricycle

“It’s terribly easy to laugh at passion”

Women, Power and Politics: Then is one half of a larger programme of activities by the Tricycle looking at the role of women in power and politics to try and find an answer to the persistent under-representation of women in the corridors of power in the UK. Taking its example from last year’s The Great Game, a number of playwrights have been commissioned to create short plays from a range of perspectives and stories and performed by a large ensemble. This half looks at historical viewpoints and the other deals with modern day issues, you should note the two evenings can be enjoyed separately and do not have to be viewed in chronological order.

Directed by Indhu Rubasingham, Then features four plays The Milliner and the Weaver by Marie Jones, Handbagged by Moira Buffini, The Lioness by Rebecca Lenkiewicz and Bloody Wimmin by Lucy Kirkwood, fuller reviews of each play can be read by clicking on the links in the titles. Covering a wide range of subjects like the relationship between Queen Elizabeth II and Margaret Thatcher, the women of Greenham Common and the reign of Elizabeth I, there’s clearly a world of difference between the plays and a huge diversity in female experience throughout history, but what is striking is the similarities: in the dogged resistance to any change in the status quo no matter how discriminatory it is to enable women to participate fully in whatever process, in the conflict between the public and private personae that seem to be necessary for women to have if they are to be taken seriously. Continue reading “Review: Women, Power and Politics: Then, Tricycle”