TV Review: The Crown Series 3

Series 3 of The Crown sees new actors in across the board but Olivia Colman is sadly no Claire Foy. Helena Bonham Carter rocks though

“Sometimes duty requires one to put personal feelings…
‘And frivolity”
…aside”

Doing little to dispel rumours that she isn’t a Time Lord, The Crown takes its cues from Doctor Who as Series 3 sees the Queen regenerate from Claire Foy to Olivia Colman. And not just that, the whole cast of main players has been replaced as this new company will take us through the next couple of series. It’s a clever move, considering the spain of history that the show takes but it is also a little sad to lose such excellent performances as Vanessa Kirby’s Princess Margaret, Victoria Hamilton’s Queen Mum, Alex Jennings and Lia Williams as Edward and Wallis and of course, Foy’s exceptional work.     

Series 3 then, takes us from 1964 to 1977, featuring such notable events as the Aberfan tragedy, the moon landing and the arrival of Camilla in Charles’ life. And with its many millions and pick of the white acting talent in this country, it remains eminently watchable. That said, something has shifted for me and it just doesn’t feel as effective as the first two seasons. A large element of this is the way series creator and main writer Peter Morgan has structured the show, choosing to maintain a massive ensemble of recurring characters but keeping the focus, and turnover, of episodes relentlessly tight. Continue reading “TV Review: The Crown Series 3”

Review: All Or Nothing, Ambassadors

The ‘small’ show that could – from the Vaults to the Arts and now to the West End, Small Faces musical All Or Nothing transfers to the Ambassadors Theatre

“I am going to exploit every last bit of you”

I have to hold my hands up, I couldn’t name you more than one Small Faces song if I tried, and that’s only because of the M-People cover of ‘Itchycoo Park’ from my formative years. Which is the main reason that it has taken me this long to getting round to see All Or Nothing, the nature of a jukebox musical tending towards existing fans of the music.

Of course, the ideal is that a show can break out to expand its reach to a wider audience (in a way that Sunny Afternoon did, for me at least), and I’m not sure that All or Nothing quite has those chops. Introduced and quasi-narrated by an older Steve Marriott, the band’s frontman, who reflects back on the band’s rise to fame with something close to rose-tinted glasses. Continue reading “Review: All Or Nothing, Ambassadors”