Lockdown treat: an American Idiot ‘Green Day Medley’

American Idiot West End and UK Tour Casts sing a Green Day Medley for the Barn Theatre and The Ben Kinsella Trust

Donations can be made to the Barn Theatre at http://www.barntheatre.org/sob, calling 01285 648255 or texting SAVEOURBARN 10 to donate £10 to 70085, texts cost the donation value plus one standard rate message.

Donations to The Ben Kinsella Trust can be made at http://www.benkinsella.org.uk/support

 

Heart vector created by starline – www.freepik.com 

Review: Chess, London Coliseum

Nobody’s on nobody’s side – an all-star cast can’t save this game of Chess from itself, for me at least

“From square one I’ll be watching all sixty-four”

It’s taken over 30 years for Chess to return to the West End (though it was seen at the Union in 2013) and though it has a huge amount of resource thrown at it in Laurence Connor’s production for English National Opera, it doesn’t necessarily feel worth the wait. An 80’s mega-musical through and through with an intermittently cracking score from ABBA’s Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, Richard Nelson’s book hasn’t aged particularly well and bears the hallmarks of the  substantial tinkering it has had at every opportunity.

It’s not too hard to see why it has needed the tinkering. The mix of Cold War politics told through the prism of rival US and Soviet chess Grandmasters, love triangles and power ballads is a tricky one to get right and part of the problem seems to be just how seriously to take it all. On the one hand, the chess matches are backgrounded with montages of the real-life tensions of the 80s; on the other, scenes that take us through the various locations of the tournaments are a cringeworthy riot of cultural stereotyping that revel in their utter kitsch. Continue reading “Review: Chess, London Coliseum”

2016 BroadwayWorld UK Awards – Winners’ list

Best Actor in a New Production of a Musical
Michael Xavier – Sunset Boulevard – London Coliseum

Best Actor in a New Production of a Play
Ian McKellen – No Man’s Land – Wyndham’s Theatre

Best Actress in a New Production of a Musical
Carrie Hope Fletcher – Chitty Chitty Bang Bang – UK Tour

Best Actress in a New Production of a Play
Billie Piper – Yerma – Young Vic

Best Choreography of a New Production of a Play or Musical
Polly Bennett – People, Places and Things – Wyndham’s Theatre

Best Costume Design of a New Production of a Play or Musical
Gregg Barnes – Aladdin – Prince Edward Theatre

Best Direction of a New Production of a Musical
Matthew Warchus – Groundhog Day – Old Vic

Best Direction of a New Production of a Play
Adam Penford – The Boys in the Band – Park Theatre

Best Lighting Design of a New Production of a Play or Musical
Hugh Vanstone – Groundhog Day – Old Vic

Best Long-running West End Show
Les Miserables – Queen’s Theatre

Best Long-running West End Show Performer (Female)
Katy Secombe – Les Miserables – Queen’s Theatre

Best Long-running West End Show Performer (Male)
Craige Els – Matilda the Musical – Cambridge Theatre

Best New London Fringe Production
I’m Getting My Act Together and Taking It on the Road – Jermyn Street Theatre

Best New Play
Annie Baker – The Flick – National Theatre

Best New Production of a Musical
In the Heights – King’s Cross Theatre

Best New Regional Production
Half a Sixpence – Chichester Festival Theatre

Best Revival of a Musical
Show Boat – New London Theatre

Best Revival of a Play
A Midsummer Night’s Dream – Shakespeare’s Globe

Best Set Design of a New Production of a Play or Musical
Rob Howell – Groundhog Day – Old Vic

Best Supporting Actor in a New Production of a Musical
David Bedella – In the Heights – King’s Cross Theatre

Best Supporting Actor in a New Production of a Play
Tom Burke – The Deep Blue Sea – National Theatre

Best Supporting Actress in a New Production of a Musical
Victoria Hamilton-Barritt – In the Heights – King’s Cross Theatre

Best Supporting Actress in a New Production of a Play
Natalie Simpson – Hamlet – Royal Shakespeare Theatre

Outstanding Achievement in a New Dance Production
Drew McOnie – Jekyll & Hyde – Old Vic

Outstanding Achievement in a New Opera Production
Iris – Opera Holland Park

Theatrical Event of the Year
Groundhog Day – Old Vic

Theatrical Venue of the Year
Arts Theatre

Understudy of the Year in Any Play or Musical (Female)
Alice Stokoe – American Idiot – Arts Theatre

Understudy of the Year in Any Play or Musical (Male)
Cellen Chugg Jones – American Idiot – Arts Theatre

Review: School of Rock, New London

“Wreck your room and rip your jeans.
Show ‘em what rebellion means”

The 2003 Jack Black-starring film School of Rock was a big success, trading off its stock talent show plot device with genuine rock music credentials in a soundtrack full of the likes of AC/DC, Led Zeppelin and The Doors. So it was a little bit of a surprise to find that Andrew Lloyd-Webber decided to adapt it into an original musical – his version of rock is certainly not the same as that espoused by Dewey Finn, School of (Pop-)Rock perhaps.

But one sticky moment aside (where a snippet of Stevie Nicks’ Edge of Seventeen sits awkwardly alongside a rock ballad ‘Where Did the Rock Go?’ exposing the contrast between the two kinds of rock), this School of Rock is a cheerily appealing slice of musical theatre. And with a seemingly endless role call of talented youngsters who, as we’re reminded at the beginning and the end of the show, play all their own instruments live, shows off a wealth of emerging British musical theatre talent. Continue reading “Review: School of Rock, New London”

Review: Dogfight, Southwark Playhouse

“Lock your door and hide your daughter”

After the extraordinary success that was In The Heights, the Southwark Playhouse have gone for another American musical theatre import in the shape of 2012’s Dogfight. But whilst expectations were high – something heightened by the auditorium being in the same configuration as for that previous show, the reality fell far short. Peter Duchan’s book, based on the 1991 film of the same name, follows a group of boisterous marines in San Francisco on the night before they’re due to fly out to Vietnam as they look to maintain the (dis)honourable tradition of holding a dogfight.

As we come to realise, their version of a dogfight is distinctly unpleasant, a cruel game played on unsuspecting women and though he is a part of this world of pent-up testosterone and hints of sexual violence, the young Eddie Birdlace soon comes to regret his choice of victim – a sweet waitress called Rose – and tries to make amends, though whether this is because he has fallen instantly in love with her or he has spotted an easy way to get laid on his last night is anyone’s guess. So what is trying to be a sweet love story is overlaid with this troubling sour note throughout. Continue reading “Review: Dogfight, Southwark Playhouse”

Review: Songs from the Playground, Union Theatre

“Here’s a little thing I wrote about life”

A little Sunday night treat at the Union was Songs from the Playground, a showcase of new musical theatre writer John Kristian, giving us snippets from a number of his works-in-progress and featuring a cast of performers that pleasingly contained few of the usual suspects. Don’t get me wrong, I love Julie Atherton, I truly do, but it is nice to see someone else get to do the comedy song for once 😉 And there’s a big one here in the form of ‘The Big O’ with which Catherine Digges had great, knee-trembling fun.

That song came from his revue show Hidden Talents but most of the first act focused on his first musical Vow and an adaptation of the well-known film The Holiday (although it was new to me…). Presented without introduction, it was a solid rather than a spectacular beginning to the evening, a constant flow of context-free new material is hard to fully process though Dan Looney and Bronté Barbé’s awkward teenage party encounter ‘Kiss Me’ was very well done as was Looney’s rapid rattle through ’23 Vows’. Continue reading “Review: Songs from the Playground, Union Theatre”