Some early October musical news

Put A Pin In It Productions (a new Brighton based production company with a big heart and big ambition) brings a not-to-be-missed show to The Old Market in Hove this autumn. Voices of Today and Tomorrow is a musical show tunes event with a difference – partnering established West End stars with talented newcomers who are already making waves on the fringe of the industry and are sure-fire stars of tomorrow!

Jodie Steele, Luke Bayer, Maiya Quansah-Breed, Joanne Harper and Alexandra Doar plus Brighton-born Alex James Ellison, creator of the hit musical, FIVER, are set to appear live in concert alongside some of the UK’s most promising up-and-coming talent in the musical theatre industry, including Frankie Davison, Eleanor Lakin, Daniel Walford, Katie Ramshaw and Amie Shouler. Continue reading “Some early October musical news”

News: Sunday at the Musicals to return

A new version of Sunday at the Musicals will return to The Actors’ Church in London on Sunday 22nd November at 5.30pm and 8.00pm. The concert will feature a large cast of West End singers who will perform songs from popular musicals to raise funds for Acting for Others.

The performances will be hosted by Sarah-Louise Young and the company, subject to availability natch, are: Kelly Agbowu, Kacey Ainsworth, Tsemaye Bob-Egbe, Charlie Bull, Colin Burnicle, Matthew Croke, Janie Dee, Nicole Raquel Dennis, Sue Devaney, Leanne Garretty, Rebecca Gilliland, Lisa Gorgin, Melissa Jacques , Claudia Kariuki, Natalie Kassanga, Sejal Keshwala, Anna McGarahan, James Meunier, Ceili O’Connor, Rosa O’Reilly, Mira Ormala, Sarah O’Connor, Charlotte O’Rourke, Sara Poyzer, Sophie Reeves, Joshua St Clair, Liam Tobin, Shona White, Pippa Winslow and Benjamin Yates.

Tickets for the new Sunday at the Musicals concert at The Actors’ Church can be booked here.

Re-review: Mary Poppins, Prince Edward Theatre

So good I went twice in as many weeks! I rave about Mary Poppins as it delights the West End at the Prince Edward Theatre

“I suffer no nonsense and whilst I remain
There’s nothing else I feel I need to explain”

So good I went twice in as many weeks! When the opportunity presented itself to go back to Mary Poppins, I couldn’t help myself. So why not take a read of my five star review for Official Theatre here. And if you’re that way inclined, you can read my other review here.

Running time: 2 hours 50 minutes (with interval)
Photos: Johan Persson
Mary Poppins is booking at the Prince Edward Theatre until 3rd May

Review: Mary Poppins, Prince Edward Theatre

Someone clearly has too much time on their hands…enjoy the wordplay in this review of this spectcular revival of Mary Poppins at the Prince Edward Theatre

“Um-dittle-ittl-um-dittle-I
Um-dittle-ittl-um-dittle-I”

Strallens to the fore,
umbrellas at the ready,
penguins…well we won’t mention them. Making its return to the Prince
Edward Theatre where it debuted in 2004, this
revival of
classic musical Mary Poppins
arrives at just the right time to
lift our spirits as the nights start to draw
in and politicians spout
falsehood after falsehood to further darken our nights. And there’s a
rollicking good time to be had here
as the show recalls the
good old days of easy-going entertainment.
In the
leading role, Zizi Strallen
is a constant delight as the
stern nanny with just the right amount of
twinkle in her eye as she alights upon the Banks’ household. Vocally, she
is impressive too, whether rebuffing
Charlie Stemp’s charmingly flirtatious Bert whose
enormous perma-grin may or may not be the result of
xanax
pills.
In the roles of the domestic staff, Claire Machin
and Jack North get many a
laugh and
if George Banks isn’t the  
dad of your dreams, Joseph Millson pretty much is.
Obviously
children play a big part
in this world and the pair
of tykes I saw this evening were
unusually
sweet and sour as their characters are much naughtier than the film. Continue reading “Review: Mary Poppins, Prince Edward Theatre”

How to solve a problem like a compilation – my alternative Unmasked

Andrew Lloyd Webber, Unmasled

I make my own suggestions about interpretations of Andrew Lloyd Webber songs that could have been included on his new compilation album Unmasked

“They must have excitement, and so must I”

In a world of Spotify and iTunes and other online music services, compilation albums ought to have died a death. But the enduring success of the Now That’s What I Call Music series puts the lie to that, showing that while the idea of curating your own content is tempting, many of us prefer to let someone else do it for us.

So Andrew Lloyd Webber’s decision to release new anthology Unmasked is a canny one in that respect (read my review here), tapping into the desire to have a nicely pleasant set of musical theatre tunes to pop on in the car. And as with any compilation, it’s as much about what hasn’t been included as what has, that stands out. Continue reading “How to solve a problem like a compilation – my alternative Unmasked”

Review: The Braille Legacy, Charing Cross

“Liberté, égalité, fraternité”

The uninitiated might take the existence of braille for granted but Sébastien Lancrenon and Jean-Baptiste Saudray’s The Braille Legacy dramatises the fascinating and moving true story behind its invention. Translated by Ranjit Bolt, the musical slots neatly into Thom Southerland’s takeover of the Charing Cross Theatre and supported as it is by the Royal National Institute of Blind People, it makes for an interesting piece.

Blinded in a childhood accident, Louis Braille’s keen intelligence saw him ruffle feathers at the Royal Institute for Blind Youth where he resided, mainly because prevailing societal attitudes considered the blind to be untrainable. Frustrated by the limits of the opportunities open to him and his schoolmates, he began to develop the tactile code which would unlock the key to reading text – it would be, however, a far from simple journey. Continue reading “Review: The Braille Legacy, Charing Cross”